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3D Highlander

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 7:51 pm
by kevinthorp
Since I don't have a real Highlander kit (yet) I thought I'd start modeling one in 3D.  This could be handy for experimenting with paint schemes, and possibly importing into a flight simulator.

I found line drawings of the top view & side view that I'm using as "blueprints".  Does anybody have a line drawing of the front view?  It's not as important, but would help.

I'll periodically post work-in-progress images until it's done, or I get bored & quit; whichever comes first. :?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 12:32 am
by kevinthorp
Rendering #2.  It's starting to look vaguely like a Highlander

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:12 am
by Dave Krall CFII SEL SES
That's quite cool, can you do one with floats, and a nose gear version as well?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:46 pm
by Johnny C!
Nice job, Kevin!

What program are you using?

John

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:54 pm
by kevinthorp
I'm using Autodesk 3ds Max.  It's quite expensive ($3,500.00) but there are other programs much less expensive that can do just as well for this type of thing.

But they're all rather difficult to learn.

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 1:46 pm
by Johnny C!
I have Solidworks 2008 at home, &
we just went to Inventor 2008 at work...

Keep it up!

John

Highlander Graphic Models

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2008 10:04 pm
by Wes
Kevin,
Nice work!
As you probably know, the Highlander is a great airplane, but very little has been done to document the design, at least from an engineering perspective. If you could actually advance your model to the point of dimensioning and tolerancing to some detail, you would accomplish a great service to the builders and perhaps even to the factory,( lest they become interested in such things).

Thanks for sharing your work.


Wes

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 1:52 am
by kevinthorp
Yeah - the JA technical documentation is a little... sparse.  It seems in many cases the types of people that are good at designing aircraft are rather poor at drawings and writing technical procedures.  And hiring a person (or persons) to do that is very expensive.

The program I'm using (Autodesk 3ds Max) is not a CAD program; it cannot be used to make any sort of engineering drawings.  You'd need Autocad, or better yet, Autodesk Inventor, Pro Engineer, Solid Edge or SolidWorks.  3ds Max is a "visualization" program.  It lets you create cool 3d images & videos but you can't create engineering drawings or export dimensional data to any type of CNC tooling.

I do use SolidWorks in my day job (machine design engineer) but to properly document something as complicated as a Highlander would take many weeks, and I'd need to have the aircraft close by, to take hundreds (thousands?) of measurements.  I'm trying to model this thing from photos on this forum & the JA website.

Anyway, here #3 WIP:

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 9:31 am
by kevinthorp
Here's a short low resolution "walk around" animation: http://www.box.net/shared/5hzi4lpq17

Link no longer works.  See post below.

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:24 am
by kevinthorp
Here's iteration #4.  It's starting to look a little more like a Highlander.  "Walk around" animation: http://www.box.net/shared/hy4n40ojo9

3D Highlander

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:18 pm
by Wes
Kevin,
That is REALLY cool stuff, --  thanks for sharing!
When I first got my kit, I had the bright idea, - I'll just document the pieces as I assemble! I am a hacker with Turbo-Cad.
Well, I quickly found out I would be spending all my time on the computer and very little actually hammering together and airplane.
So as much as my engineering mind would love to have drawings, I would rather be flying!
Is that model file useable by any "poor mans" drawing program? I was thinking of playing with color schemes.

Thanks Again!

Wes

experimenting with color schemes

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 4:41 am
by fiferphil
Hi Kevin,

I took the liberty of taking your three view computer renderings and applying some of the trechery of  Adobe Photoshop Elements.  With your drawings and Photoshop you can develope some pretty fancy schemes and get an idea of how they'll look. You can also "repaint" or modify paint schemes on photagraphs that are submitted in this forums. see attachments

Hope this helps .

Phil

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 2:33 pm
by kevinthorp
Wes - I can export an "STL" file.  Can you import one?  The bad news is I doubt you'll be able to edit it, but you might be able to open it, rotate, zoom, pan, etc. My animation software is a polygon modeler.  3d CAD programs are solid modelers.   They don't play well together.

Phil - I hope you weren't thinking about painting one plane that way. :shock:  It  would be good for visibility, I guess.  Actually the way 3D models are "painted" is by applying 2D images (GIFs, JPGs, etc.) to various surfaces.  Flat things like rudders and elevators are simple.  Wrapping images around 3d surfaces, like a fuselage is more challenging.   Hmm... I guess you could say the same thing about taping & painting a "real" plane.

Wierd paint schemes

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:47 pm
by fiferphil
Kevin -- Naw, I was just using the flat surfaces on the drawings to see what kind of effects I could get with Photoshop. I have seen, however, a paint job on a Pitts Special that was similar to that. It was done by an art professor at a local college in PA back in the '70's. I'll probably stick with a basic white with red and blue trim or maybe go with somthing like Gary H's scheme, (that's a super lookin' bird!) only in white with red and blue trim. I do want high visibility.

Phil

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 4:56 pm
by Dave Krall CFII SEL SES
Those are nicely done!
Is it just me or are the wings pictured narrower than in true to scale?