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Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:55 pm
by BucF16
This builder’s sight has been a little dormant since Keith built his record-breaking build assist. So I’ll chime in here from time to time, and let you all know how my build is progressing:

I had just started working on my project when ….. last January I was taking a bag of mineral to the cattle on our farm, and stepped into a deep hole and BAM, torn meniscus. Surgery, Rehad, Etc….. So now its January 2017 and I’ve finally addressed all of my wife’s honey dos, accumulated since my mishap; BUT, too cold to work in my unheated hangar. There’s room to work for the wings in the basement, so I brought one in and started on it. I have a Quick Build kit that was Rigged to fuselage, leading edge wrap, and tanks installed. The Ping-Pong table is full of parts and tools, the folding card table is full; so were to work? Ah, I’ll make a new sturdy work bench (I have lots of spare wood in the barn). I go and Google “sturdy work bench plans”, and #3 hit from the top is a YouTube that describes this:

“Quantity 2 4X4s
Quantity 4 2X4s
Quantity 4 Simpsion RTC 42
Bunch of crews (I used 1 ¼ in pocket screws)
¾ inch plywood to fit (for top)
Total cost $80 bucks”

I had the wood already, and found an old countertop the was a second at Lowes .

So in 2 hours, with my 14 year old’s help I had an awesome STURDY work Bench.

The key was the Simpson Strong RTC 42 (Google it) which was the only component that I bought.

Pictures below.

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:04 pm
by BucF16
One more Pix

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:12 pm
by BucF16
The pocket screws were to draw down the countertop. I used 1" drywall screws to attach the Simpson Strong RTC42 (but in the future I'll use pocket screws for the RTC 42, as these screws have a flange to lay flat on the metal). There is a little trick to the RTC 42; screw in the 2X4s beams first, then screw in the outside 4X4 screws and last the interior 4X4 screws. That will draw it all together nice and tight. Good luck
Bruce

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 8:29 am
by AV8R Paul
I've built 3 work benches using those brackets, they definitely make for an sturdy bench, and they are fast and easy to build.
I used 5/8 inch plywood for the top and put a storage shelf about 1/2 way up the legs so I could store supplies on the shelf & on the floor.

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 12:16 pm
by moving2time
Nice table. I have never seen the Simpson rtc42 brackets so I learned something. Most build tables I have seen has apiece of particle board or plywood for the top. The intent was to screw or drill into the top as necessary while building. It was considered disposable. Those brackets look like they make assembly fairly simple. I like it! You thinking of building a rotisserie for the wings and/or fuselage? Joe B

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 5:50 pm
by BucF16
Hey JoeB,
It was easy-peasy to build. I would usually use particle board for the top, but 25 years ago I was walking through Lowe's, and way in the back there were 3 countertops stacked up. each of different color and length. There was a "Manager"s Special" sign on them. No price. SOoo I went and found the manager and he asked "what will you pay for them". I said a "hundred bucks". I took them home. My father took 1 and I immediately took the 10 footer and made my central shop bench. I've built 3 aircraft on it. The 6 footer had been tucked away in my Barn/Hangar for years. I almost forgot that I had it.

As for the rotisseries, I had never used one on any of my previous build, BUT I saw all types, between the JA factory and builder's blogs and websites. The one that caught my eye was the one that they used at the site where Keith Showalter built his Super-Stol. They had modified a Harbor Freight engine stand into a Rotisserie. I only saw it in the background, but why improvise when you can plagiarize. :D

I'm at Harbor Freight at least twice a month, so I got 3 of the type Keith was using. I took it to a friend who had a gravity band saw and cut them. As you see I took some of my 2X2 metal square stock and welded the stand into a vertically adjustable Rotisserie. Some here like to weld their own and I did 1 but, time is money for me, so this was the quickest for the next 3. Here it is:

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:46 pm
by dkshow
Those engine stand rotisseries work great! That's a Rob Pedersen invention, who knows where he got the idea from. If you're careful you can actually move wings around by yourself with these. I think Rob said he installed both wings on his SS by himself with these stands, it's much easier with two people but it can be done with just one.

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:31 am
by moving2time
Bruce, So you cut the vertical tube and welded 2x2 tubes into the base to make it adjustable? I need to head out to Harbor freight to check out their engine stand models. Looks like a quick modification with wheels already to go. Another great Idea Rob. Thanks guys. Joe B

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:19 pm
by AV8R Paul
FYI, Harbor Freight Engine Stand. A 750 Pound Capacity Engine Stand for $49, definitely a good Price. However, I purchased on at a Garage sale for $10. You might consider going to your Local Pawn Shops, they always have mechanics tools, at very reasonable prices.

Re: Sturdy work bench

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 5:40 pm
by BucF16
The 1000# one is a better choice ( unfortunately I didn't make it) as the post is vertical. I had to make a later cut and re-weld so that to rotisserie was perpendicular to the ground.

Bruce