Kit #87 started.

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Includes: Highlander, Escapade, Summit and SuperSTOL.

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Postby Stan Bearup » Tue Jan 24, 2006 12:57 am

Wes,

Congratulations on your Highlander kit purchase, and welcome aboard. I have been building my Highlander for a few months now and am currently working on the instrument panel. I have nearly all of the systems in the fuselage complete and am getting close to start the covering process. The Kydex interior that I fabricated is in, as is the battery, control systems, etc. After I complete the panel, I plan to jump onto the wings, flaps and ailerons to get them ready for covering. Once I have everthing ready for covering, I plan to jump right in and hope to have it all ready for paint by spring.

Cheers!

Stan Bearup
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I'll get there someday!

Postby Wes » Tue Jan 24, 2006 5:14 pm

Stan,
Thanks for the greetings and update on your kit. The pic' you posted is GREAT, thanks.
I am still fiddling with getting a work space set up in the garage. The kit is stored temporarily in the enclosed trailer that I bought from Dave. There is actually room to work in the trailer, but I get a little nervous parking it out front where the neighbors have to navigate around it.
I ran across a question while temp' fitting the flap handle assembly. The manual (parag 6.10, step 4) says to install the "roll bolt" through the hole in the insert, trouble is, there is no hole in my insert, so I guess I have to drill one. Did you run across this?, and if so, how did you determine where to drill the hole in the insert?
I'm curious about the "Kydex" interior, what is it, and where did you find it?
Thanks again,
Wes
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Postby Stan Bearup » Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:05 pm

Wes,

The hole in the flap handle insert is 1/2" from the bottom. It should not be a big deal to just drill it out with the correct size bit.

Kydex is a really tough plastic like material that has a textured finish on one side of it an smooth on the back. It meets the FAR requirement for flame resistance and can be bent in a brake or heat formed. It cuts with a carpenter knife fairly easily and makes for a great aircraft interior. It is a little heavier than the fabric type interiors installed in the Highlanders and Escapdes that I have seen, but WAY tougher. I plan to use my Hghlander for camping, hunting and fishing and don't want to punch holes through the fabric from sharp things I may be carring in the airplane with me. You can read more about it at http://www.sdplastics.com/kydex/kydex.html This is where I purchased the two sheets that I needed. If you would like to see more photos, just send me a private message at [email protected].

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Re: Flap Roll Bolt

Postby utpa001 » Mon Feb 20, 2006 2:34 pm

You've probably already moved way beyond your flap handle, but maybe someone else will find this helpful in the future.

I put the insert into the outer tube, and drilled with a cordless drill through the slot on the outer tube.  I did this because it appeard that the slot was not centered, and so drilling with a drill press or something may create a hole that does not alight with the slot.  I also shortened my insert by a couple inches, so that when depressed it is only about 1/4 to 1/2 inch extended from the outer tube (and thus easier to operate).

I'm glad to see this forum is becoming more populated with Highlander/Escapade builders, it could prove very helpful.  Does anyone know if there are any other locations on the internet that Highlander builders are meeting.

Tim
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Flap Handle and Other Cockpit Bits

Postby Wes » Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:04 am

Tim,
Thanks for the tips. As it turned out, I did something similar, - trimmed the insert rod to overall length of 15 & 1/8 inch and drilled the hole 9/16 from the bottom end. I found I also had to trim the spring length to keep it from fully compressing to "solid height". The assembly seems to work fine with a little grease. I found the manual illustration of flap plat layout a little misleading (wrong?), so I just fit the flap handle assembly in the fuselage and marked the mounting holes to match the welded bushings when the handle had sufficient clearance.
I'm on to fitting the push-pull tubes and tweeking (bending) fuselage and tubes to provide a smooth travel.
Test flight - imminent! (well, maybe next year)

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Postby alan » Mon Jun 19, 2006 10:33 pm

Kit #87 is dang near finished. I should recieve my choke parts this week. These are the last parts I will need in order to start the 912. I can then permanently install the boot cowl and thus the bottom part of the windshield. I have waited until the last minute to run the engine as the 6 month warranty starts at that time. A couple weeks ago we put fuel in the tanks and did a flow test. With the tail wheel on the floor each tank will flow 6 gallons per hour with gravity alone.

I've started working on the paperwork and I am going to invite EAA Chapter 712 over for a final inspection before the FAA (actually a DAR) does the official inspection. If all goes well, N1010Z will fly next month.  :shock:

Alan
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Postby KevinC » Tue Jun 20, 2006 4:36 pm

That is great, Alan.  Got pictures?

Can you describe how you did the windshield, please?  I am a long way from there, but am having trouble imagining the process based on the manual description.

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Postby alan » Fri Jun 23, 2006 7:27 pm

KevinC,

The windshield is actually very simple. Measure across the back of your butt ribs and then across the front. They might be a little different. Mark the middle of your lexan sheet in three places: back, front of the butt ribs, and then the front where it will end(all the way to the bottom by the firewall). Now mark the sheet with the width measurements you took earlier. You might want to lay the sheet on top of the airplane and verify the measurements. Measure thrice, cut once. Trim, with aircraft sheet metal snips, your cut line on both sides. Now you will have to clearance the spar pin holes. The best way is to go ahead and lay out your rivit holes on the butt ribs, drill them, and then drill through the lexan last, cleco as you go. You will then be able to see how much to cut away for the spar pins. Cut a little at a time, both sides, and pull the lexan down on each side to see how it fits, 'cuz it will change as you do that.

Remember to not cut with a recipricating saw. Use snips and files. Lexan won't break easily, but it will scratch. Also, if you are doing this in the winter, make sure the lexan is warm or it will break.

When you are ready to rivit, drill all of your holes oversize as the rivits expand when pulled and will crack around each hole sooner or later. I know this for a fact.

I used #6 screws w/nuts & washers to attach the windshield to the root cowl. After you have rivited the butt ribs, attach the root cowl to the windshield (I added some RTV on this join), screw the root cowl to the airframe sides, then rivit through the aluminum trim pieces to attach the windshield sides. This ensures the windshield will be tight up against the cowl and not be pulled away by the side attachment.

There is more to it than this, but this overview should help some.

I'll try to attach pictures soon, but I am not too good with computers. I do have a digital camera, so I'll give it a try.

Alan
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Postby alan » Mon Jul 03, 2006 10:31 pm

Greetings All,

My FAA (actually DAR) inspection will be this Wednesday. I hope I am prepared for it. The first flight will be as soon after the airworthiness certificate is issued (maybe Wednesday?) as the weather will allow. I has rained quite a lot here in the Houston area with projection for rain every day for the next week.

I will now attempt to attach a few pictures. Here goes nothing.
Attachments
camera download 07012006019.JPG
camera download 07012006019.JPG (423.63 KiB) Viewed 4339 times
camera download 07012006012.JPG
camera download 07012006012.JPG (358.29 KiB) Viewed 4339 times
camera download 07012006003.JPG
camera download 07012006003.JPG (371.73 KiB) Viewed 4339 times
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Postby alan » Thu Jul 06, 2006 8:54 am

Great news! We passed our FAA inspection! The DAR came out and looked over the aircraft (it used to be a project but is now an aircraft!) for 20 minutes or so and found a couple of small items he suggested we might want to change. He even suggested to bystanders that we left those things so he would feel better. Quite a compliment. He was there about an hour and a half, mostly BSing. We now have all the documents we need to fly. Yeehaa!  :D

Alan & N1010Z
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Way To Go!

Postby Wes » Thu Jul 06, 2006 11:18 pm

Alan,
Beautiful pics and Great looking airplane! Congratulations, - I think you are the first of the web group to actually put together a flyable airplane.
I am lagging about a year behind you since I have been tied up most of the year with "other priorities" (read that - wife's to-do list).
Good luck on the test flight and us "wannabee's" would be interested in some performance numbers when you get them.
Rotax or Jab?
Wes
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Postby alan » Sun Jul 23, 2006 11:52 am

OK, guys. Here are some numbers:

aircraft: Highlander
engine: Rotax 912ULS 100hp
propeller: Warp Drive three blade 70" straight blades set @12 degrees
condition: no doors, no interior
weight: 680 lbs
cg empty: 8.2" (can't go out of forward cg even with empty tanks and 100 lb pilot)

ALL BELOW NUMBERS ARE WITH FULL FUEL AND 250 LB PILOT @ 1000 ft and hot (95 deg)

climb rpm: 5500
climb rate: 1000 fpm @60 mph ias
full throttle straight and level: 5800 rpm and 105 mph ias
cruise: 5000 rpm is 90 mph ias and 4.5 gph
          OP: 48 psi
          OT: 196 deg f
          CHT: 226 deg f
cruise: 4600 rpm is 80 mph ias and 4.0 gph
          OP: 48 psi
          OT: 180 deg f
          CHT: 218 deg f
stalls: no flaps: about 30 mph ias
        full flaps: about 35 mph ias

I have not installed the Vortex Generators. I wanted to get used to the flying/landing
qualities without them first so I could really tell if they made a difference.

Troy tells me putting the doors on will add 7 to 10 mph to all my speeds.

On the weight, after finding out she weighed 680 lbs, I called Just Aircraft. We had expected
the aircraft to weigh around 600 lbs, as that is what all the literature says. Jamie said it should
be around that number, maybe a little more. I began to suspect my digital bathroom scales were
inaccurate. About a half hour later, Jamie called back and said they were in the process of weighing
their Jabaru powered Highlander. Their plane, with a full interior and a heavier engine weighed
723 lbs. We felt MUCH better! We probably have a heavier covering and paint job than them, but
that is about all that could be more.

And now for the good stuff.

The DAR inspection went well on 7/5. The first flight was almost as good on 7/7. It had been raining
quite a bit here, so we trailered her over to Baytown Humphry airport for highspeed taxi tests and
first flight. I couldn't control her on the asphalt up to flying speed. My test card called for several
crow hops to get used to the control feel, especially the rudder on roll out. Couldn't do it. Finally called
Dunham field and Terry said the grass was wet, but there was no standing water or mud. So we packed
up again and trailered over there. Sure enough, those big tires would slide some on grass and not grab
like they did on asphalt. About three crow hops later, she felt good, so I added power and up we
went!

The first flight only lasted a bout .5 hours, including crow hops. All temps were in the green. The next
I flew for 1.5 hours and noticed a heavy left wing. I started cranking down on the left wing trailing edge
(effectively increasing the angle of attack of the left wing) with the rod end bearing on the strut. With
the rod end bearing all the way down the wing heavy condition is gone and the plane flys hands off!

After about 10 hours and 20 or so landings, I felt ready to brave the asphalt. It still felt a little twitchy,
but I had no real problems on the first of about 10 landings on asphalt. Practice makes perfect.

On 7/21, after 15 elapsed days, 11 of which were flying days, the airplane had 40.4 hours of actual
flight time. With no squawks, no leaks, no problems, and an encouraging wife, I was able to take my
co-builder, O.B. Aylor (88 years old and rarin' to go) up for a ride. He did most of the flying on that
flight and said "We built a fine little airplane, didn't we!" The next ride was to my long-suffering wife.
She really enjoyed it and is looking forward to many more.

I hope this wasn't to long and the numbers I recorded will be usefull

Alan
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WOW! Good Write-up!

Postby Wes » Mon Jul 24, 2006 9:50 am

Alan,
Thanks for taking the time tyo put that together! SUPER! I am hanging on every number and observation.
The only comment I had was maybe the flaps/noflaps stall numbers might be reversed? (I hope).
Since I've yet to ride in or fly one of these machines, I have taken a lot on faith, and really appreciate the flight reports.
Now have the fuselage set up on the "rotiserie" and hope to start covering some of the smaller bits before tackling the the wings and frame.
Way To Go! and Enjoy!
Wes
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Postby alan » Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:42 pm

Wes,

I was just trying to see if you were paying attention. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. :roll:

Stick with it and keep plugging away. Do a little each day and before you know it you will be there.
The resulting airplane will be very much worth the effort.  :D

Alan
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Exhaust System

Postby 678GOFLYHI landers » Mon Aug 14, 2006 2:30 am

Alan,

Which exhaust system are you using on your 912S?
Mark--
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